15 Health foods that are really junk

http://healthydebates.com/15-health-foods-really-junk-foods-disguise/

Well, maybe none of this is news to the few who read this blog, but there are some interesting links about modern wheat in the wholewheat section, including:

Modern Wheat – Old Diet Staple Turned Into a Modern Health Nightmare

from the above link the two following:

       Use of selected sourdough strains of Lactobacillus for removing gluten and enhancing the nutritional properties of gluten-free bread. (Shows decrease of gluten in experimental doughs from 400 ppm to 20ppm by using sourdough fermentation vs. typical commercial yeast leavening, proving that slow natural fermentation significantly alters the gluten profile. Basically, if you ferment the dough properly, the gluten issue is eliminated which is why I only offer organically fermented ‘sourdoughs’.)

       Sourdough bread made from wheat and nontoxic flours and started with selected lactobacilli is tolerated in celiac sprue patients.

Evidence of decreasing mineral density in wheat grain over the last 160 years.

Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients

Search for atoxic cereals: a single blind, cross-over study on the safety of a single dose of Triticum monococcum, in patients with celiac disease

Characterization of Khorasan wheat (Kamut) and impact of a replacement diet on cardiovascular risk factors: cross-over dietary intervention study.

Effects of Short-Term Consumption of Bread Obtained by an Old Italian Grain Variety on Lipid, Inflammatory, and Hemorheological Variables: An Intervention Study

 The sourdough fermentation may enhance the recovery from intestinal inflammation of coeliac patients at the early stage of the gluten-free diet.  (This experiment used sourdough fermentation on gluten free doughs and found they greatly assisted celiac patients in healing gut issues. I suspect similar results would be found when eating my whole grain rye if not all breads offered.)

Some of this stuff is overly technical for many tastes (including mine), and most too extreme (why don’t they have more tests on classic sourdough whole grain rye, Red Fife wheat, spelt, the stuff most of organic bakers and eaters eat rather than rare local varieties or almost unobtainable triticum etc.? In any case, there have been scattered tests, some of which are buried somewhere in this blog.

The bottom line: modern bread comprised of modern wheats, overly processed flours, raised with commercial, single-strain factory-grown, sugar-fed yeasts are essentially what I think of as ‘mass-produced imitation breads’. And some ‘artisan-breads’ are simply small-volume, even hand-made variations on the same ingredients and techniques because the bakers (either home or small artisan bakeries) know no better.
I continue to offer with pride – despite declining sales of late as the gluten-free craze catches on in Cape Breton – heritage grain, slow-fermented breads made correctly without compromise. They are nourishing, highly digestible and good-tasting. They are real food. At some point the fashion will change and people will come back to these breads. Meanwhile I hunker down for a long, hard winter!
Btw, I have an occasional customer is a full-bore celiac who gets violent reactions if she even so much as tastes ‘normal’ bread, but she can eat as much as she likes of mine without any adverse reaction.

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Study: Roundup (glyphosate) may cause Gluten Intolerance

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/gluten-intolerance-from-roundup-herbicide-zw0z1402zkin.aspx

http://www.motherearthnews.com/~/media/Images/MEN/Editorial/Articles/Online%20Articles/2014/02-01/Is%20Roundup%20the%20Cause%20of%20Gluten%20Intolerance/Incidencethousands%20jpg.jpg

Increased use of Monsanto’s glyphosate herbicide (trade name Roundup) could be the cause of the epidemic of  “gluten intolerance”, according to a compelling new peer-reviewed report from two U.S. scientists. Farmers are now using glyphosate not only to control weeds but also to dry down wheat, rice, sugarcane and other crops just before harvest, resulting in higher residues in the foods we eat. The abstract from the paper “Glyphosate, Pathways to Modern Diseases II: Celiac Sprue and Gluten Intolerance” is below.  You can read the full report here and view graphs in the Slideshow connecting increased use of glyphosate with growing rates of celiac incidence, deaths from intestinal infections, acute kidney disease and deaths due to Parkinson’s.

Abstract:
Celiac disease, and more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5 percent of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup, is the most important causal factor of this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances of gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate’s strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine, and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate’s known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which has been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to harvest. We argue that the practice of “ripening” sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent surge in kidney failure among agricultural workers in Central America. We conclude with a plea to governments to reconsider policies regarding the safety of glyphosate residues in foods. Click here to read the whole article:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/~/media/2C6428C5A5254BAFB484C6E43E4ADCF9.ashx

 

Seeds of Revolution

A collection of articles read in the past couple of days, sparked by a kind submission from ‘follower’ Suzanne of the link which has ‘whole wheat doesn’t suck’ in the text (!).

The artisan as scientist: baker Jonathan McDowell in the Bread Lab Photos: Tom Philpott

Seed/Grain Research series:

http://m.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2014/02/toms-kitchen-100-whole-wheat-bread-doesnt-suck-and-pretty-easy

Suzanne’s article about a laboratory in Washington State University researching wheat varieties that make good whole grain breads, which modern wheat varieties, mainly bred to make good white flours, do not.

http://magissues.farmprogress.com/WFS/WS09Sep13/wfs006.pdf

Related article in local publication

http://news.wsu.edu/2013/11/12/bread-lab-helps-artisan-bakers-analyze-perfect-recipes/#.UwSO9hCZd8J

Another related article showing how others are interested and involved, including King Arthur Flour’s Hemmelman, without question one of the most influential bakers in America.

General Comments: I find these articles encouraging in that they make me feel less alone. I run a small operation in Sydney, a town with few people interested in such matters and indeed, the majority of ‘health food types’ here are so into gluten-free approach even though, as these articles show, what I do might be regarded as being on the cutting edge of a recent movement in creating healthy, traditional breads using heritage grains which only a small minority of artisan bakeries offer in Europe and North America. Reading these articles gives me encouragement that perhaps such efforts are not in vain, despite the relative lack of response to date.

Personally, and even thougoh I don’t use them because they cost double my current Milanaise Red Fife white, my favorite flours are the Speerville ‘Whole Whites’ made from either Red Fife or Acadia wheats; these retain most of the germ but have sifted out most of the bran. Yet I suspect that different varieties in the experiments mentioned in these articles might well have less brittle bran structures and so might make better whole grain breads, obviating the need for ‘whitening’ them. The past century, we have been favouring very hard grains not only for white flour production, but also to function optimally in steel-rollers which do not – unlike stone mills – favour soft grains. Moreover the recent hybrids have been bred to grow in dead soils augmented by synthetic nitrogen fertilizers (and a few other) chemical inputs developed by the scientist who gave us mustard gas in WWI and Zyklon B in WW II (!), and therefore are not necessarily the best grains to use for organic farmers.

These articles give hope, because I agree with the premise in some of them that it is time for us to use not only heritage varieties versus post-war hybrids, but also develop new varieties bred to flourish in particular regions and in organically cultivated (aka ‘biotically alive’) soils, and bred to make good whole grain versus white, breads. The way in which local artisans, successful chefs and millers and farmers can come together on this – even if only via an occasional conference – is a new wave in wheat growing and bread baking development, and I hope it succeeds. At the very least, it’s a refreshing example of a time-honoured battle-cry:

IIEGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM !!

(don’t let the bastards get you down!)

I wish more farmers here in Cape Breton could grow such stuff, but because of the dominance of agribusiness these days, not a single farmer on the island even grows conventional bread grains. I wish the regional Agricultural College and the Department of Agriculture were more involved in this sort of thing, but of course they mainly promote an agri-business approach to farming even if they might say, and sincerely believe, they don’t. What choice do they have? Rural communities and small farm holdings are a thing of the past; rural populations are dying out throughout the developed west with literally hundreds of villages in food-friendly France virtually empty (one occupant surrounded by thirty empty houses is quite common). Presumably, we are all supposed to move into the city and work at call centers shuffling data around. Heavy manufacturing and farm work is done by low-wage coolies in China and, no doubt in a few decades, Africa.

Anyway, these articles give me hope that maybe, just maybe, there will be a place for local and regional artisanal approaches to food and culture and more alternatives to Big Box culture in general.

Related Mother Jones articles series:

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2013/10/radical-chefs-launch-seed-revolution

Oct 4 2013: “I’m fairly confident when I say that last week at the Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture—a sprawling farm/restaurant nestled in a rural corner of Westchester County, New York, on land donated by the Rockefeller family—I witnessed the globe’s first-ever meeting between a roster of renowned chefs and a set of utterly obscure, highly accomplished plant breeders, mostly from US land grant universities.”

Top chefs from around the world meet to consider ways to work on developing more diverse, nutritious and flavourful locally grown plant varieties; new wheats developed to make pleasing whole grain loaves play big role in demonstration.

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2012/05/organic-vs-conventional-agriculture-nature

May 2 2012: “Like a good buffet, Nature‘s recent meta-analysis comparing the productivity of industrial and organic agriculture offered something for every taste.

For enthusiasts of large-scale, chemical-intensive agriculture, there was this headline finding: Yields on organic farming—the amount of crop produced per acre—are on average 25 percent lower than those of industrial farming.”

The article then goes on to argue that it ain’t that simple – at all….

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2011/06/vilsack-usda-big-ag

June 15 2011: the distortions and lies Big-Ag tell themselves and moreover try to force onto the rest of the world.

http://www.motherjones.com/blue-marble/2007/07/organic-farming-can-feed-world

July 11 2007. The effectiveness of well-administered organic farming is old news: “Organic farming can yield up to three times as much food as conventional farming on the same amount of land. A new study from the University of Michigan refutes the long-standing assumption that organic farming methods can’t produce enough food to feed the global population. The researchers found that yields in developed countries were almost equal between organic and conventional farms, while food production in developing countries could double or triple by going organic. The study also found that equal or greater yields could be accomplished using existing quantities of organic fertilizers, and without putting more farmland into production. Ivette Perfecto, of U-M’s School of Natural Resources and Environment, said the idea that people would go hungry if farming went organic is ridiculous. “Corporate interest in agriculture and the way agriculture research has been conducted in land grant institutions, with a lot of influence by the chemical companies and pesticide companies as well as fertilizer companies—all have been playing an important role in convincing the public that you need to have these inputs to produce food,” she said. JULIA WHITTY” {That’s the complete article, btw}

I will try to find links to the new RSI (?) methods in Asia which have been winning yield prizes in rice for several years now and are organic and use only self-made fertilizers, i.e. No need for corporation-supplied ‘inputs’ or subsidies or GM tyranny – the farmer can be master of his fate again.

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2011/08/green-revolution-cullather

Aug 5 2011: “In 1968, India’s farmers cranked out a record-setting wheat crop at a time when many observers feared the nation would plunge into famine. That triumphant harvest represented the culmination of decades of work by a group of foundation-funded US technocrats. Their effort, which became known as the “green revolution,” still casts an imposing shadow more than four decades later.

Its technological architect, the Nobel laureate Norman Borlaug, was all but beatified upon his death in 2009. In its obituary, Reason Magazine proclaimed him “the man who saved more human lives than anyone else in history,” while The New York Times wrote that he “did more than anyone else in the 20th century to teach the world to feed itself.”

Meanwhile, the powerhouse funding institution most associated with the Green Revolution, the Rockefeller Foundation, has joined forces with today’s richest funder, the Gates Foundation, to recreate Borlaug’s magic in Africa. Their “Alliance for a Green Revolution for Africa” push got a de facto endorsement from President Obama when he tapped Gates’ chief ag-development man, Rajiv Shah, for a top research job at USDA. Today, Shah serves as director of United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

Thus the “green revolution” idea still percolates in high-level development policy circles. But if our top foundations and development policymakers are pushing to recreate the green revolution for an entire continent, than it’s worth figuring out precisely what led up to that famous bumper crop nearly half a century ago—and what it means for the future. In his 2010 book The Hungry World, the University of Indiana historian Nick Cullather does just that.”

Sure enough, the real story is quite different. Again and again in so many fields (journalism, medicine, education, politics, food, you name it) there is a revealing pattern of greed and outright deception. It is time we collectively stop buying and eating the BS they keep shovelling down our throats and psyches.

Michael Pollan – the Science of eating well

from the podcast site Enquiring Minds: https://soundcloud.com/inquiringminds

This is an unusually intelligent food discussion.

He also explains – again unusually well – what happens with proper (sourdough) bread. He also mentions the Italian research that suggests that those eating slow fermented sourdough (20+ hours) (such as mine), even some celiacs can tolerate it.

In any case, he talks about the beneficial effects of cooking, the paleo diet issues (including the problem with factory-farmed meats vs true wild meats of yore), and the value of fermentation. Also the epidemiological studies indicating plant-based diets are best, but he qualifies that very intelligently.

Towards the end of the bread discussion he speculates that perhaps the reason people nowadays are having problems with bread/gluten is that we (our gut systems) have changed due to modern diets and lifestyles, and ‘that may be at the root of a great many of the allergies we see because gluten intolerance is …. and auto-immune disorders that has to do with our relationship with bacteria.” But the growth in gluten free is far in excess of any change in our microbial cultures.

He has written a book which emphasises the importance of microbes. So I guess I’ll have to get that book!

Not sure which book, but this guy has an interesting selection starting with ‘The Botany of Desire’ to the most recent in 2013 ‘Cooked – a natural history of transformation’ and ‘Food Politics: How the Food industry influences Nutrition and Health.’

(I am still listening to this whilst writing this entry:) Ha! He is the guy whose body-bacteria was used for some experimental cheese recently (from belly-button, between the toes etc!). This playful experiment was based on noticing that stinky cheeses have similar bacteria to those we find on our bodies. I read years ago, for example, that the only place they have found the sanfrancisco yeasts naturally is in the human mouth, not in the fair fields of California.

Then he is discussing a recent article of his in the New Yorker about the behavioural and strategic intelligence of plants. Sensory sophistication. Plants have 15-20 distinct senses – smell, taste, sound – they can recognise the sound of caterpillars chomping on leaves and then prepare chemical defense against them! – also can sense chemicals in the soil, soil, volume, hardness, touch obviously, they can move towards a pole.

To demonstrate plants ability to demonstrate intention and consciousness, in a video a friend showed him a bean-plant in time-lapse photography over several days, looking nowhere except at a pole 18″ away and it throws itself over and over again until it finally makes contact, and after it has made one revolution around, it relaxes and starts to grow on it happily, so it seems they make a noise and are using some sort of radar to sense the pole, or maybe there is some other basis. The main point is that they have incredible sensory acuteness, brilliant defenses, and have kin recognition – they don’t compete with others of the same family. Also: trees in a forest are linked by fungi, so all fir trees in a forest, for example, are linked and they use the fungal network to send both messages and food. ‘The wood-wide web’ it has been called! (and why our internal flora have to do with brain function, I am thinking.) Can plants learn? Can they remember? ( I would say yes), Even though they don’t have brains. But how can you do these things without neurons? There must be other ways. (I think most of our theories about brain function are totally wrong so this is a promising direction.)

Amazing stuff!

Amazon.ca search page on him:

http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=michael+pollan&sprefix=Pollan%2Caps%2C1191

 

By the way, I came to the above interview from one previous with Deborah Blum about poisons in modern industrial/commercial practices etc.

Michael Pollan’s Plant article in the New Yorker:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/12/23/131223fa_fact_pollan

The Greatest Hits of in NY Times:

http://6thfloor.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/17/the-greatest-hits-of-michael-pollan/

Also in NYTimes:  http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/michael_pollan/

 

Acadia Wheat

This week I used a new strain of wheat, Acadia wheat, which was developed specifically for the Maritime climate in the 1930’s. I am still trying to learn more about it but initial impressions are that it has a lighter, warmer profile than Red Fife, which is darker and more robust. Also it seems to have a more springy, albeit less chewy, gluten structure which promotes a lighter rise. I was surprised by this combination, namely that not only does the dough feel more springy and resilient, but also softer and lighter. I am hopeful this is going to be a keeper. There are scattered reports on the internet that this is better for those with gluten issues, but of course such things are

a) highly subjective and

b) rarely if ever researched thoroughly over time with large numbers of people and

c) very hard to tell in any case unless you happen to get very strong reactions to other wheats (in which case you probably will never bother to try this one!).

For example in the blog entry linked below, they say: “Acadia has proven to be agreeable with some gluten intolerances, which we all know is a growing concern for many.” (I wish such statements about being ‘proven’ were better verified …)

That said, it’s a bit hard to tell (about the Acadia) since last week I (finally!) put together a proofing chamber which maintains a much higher level of humidity than before which, especially with sourdough, promotes a more vigorous rise.

In any case, soon I’ll do a comparison bake with fresh-ground Red Fife versus Acadia loaves in otherwise identical conditions.

Meanwhile, this blog entry from a Maritime farmer who, working with Speerville, is growing this fine variety of wheat.

http://barnyardorganics.blogspot.ca/2013/10/inspectors-acadia-babies-oh-my.html

Their blog is delightfully called “For the Love of the Soil”. If gas weren’t so expensive these days, I would love to go down and visit…

Fresh-ground Acadia wheat flour, rising…..

Global Citizens Report against Big Ag, Big Pharma and Governments

Introduction:

http://farmwars.info/?p=12217

(many sites have commented on the report, in pdf format, below, so if you search for the title, you might find many other sites, albeit FarmWars is a leader at covering this sort of issue.)

The Report:

http://farmwars.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/A-Global-Citizens-Report-against-Big-Ag-Big-Pharma-and-Governments.pdf

Ok: Dr. Michael Milburn, friend and local acupuncturist, traditional chinese-style herbalist, qi gong teacher and healthy diet teacher, sent me the following report, which is a 30-page pdf containing zillions of links to other related reports, some of which I shall copy and paste below, but all of which you will find yourself if you can read through the entire thing which I recommend. It is much longer and denser than the typical 1-4 page internet or magazine article we are nowadays used to reading, but, given the subject matter, no more than a series of well-written notes highlighting various aspects each of which deserve book-length treatment, albeit all of which are well summarized in the title which is again:

Global Citizens against Big Ag, Big Pharma and Governments.

Actually, there isn’t all that much about Global Citizens doing X or Y simply because most of us are too stunned (and indifferent) to do much. Well, that’s a bit harsh: most of us lack the means to organise into bodies that can do slow, expensive, consistent work in laboratories, Courts and via lobbyists and political parties. Large corporations can sustain multi-year mutl-faceted, multi-million dollar campaigns, whereas most ordinary citizens cannot. It’s as simple as that and indeed one of the main functions of political systems (democracy, royalty, communism etc.) is to deal with the inevitability in human affairs of what can loosely be called ‘harmful centralisation’, in other words when too much organised power is concentrated in the hands of too few. It’s as simple as that.

Most of us have forgotten that the original role of the Monarch was to protect the wellbeing of the general citizenry (aka ‘subjects’) from overly ruthless feudal lords who in most societies had life-and-death power over their inferiors. Only the Monarch had life-and-death power over them. Of course the system didn’t always work as intended – like all systems – but we tend to forget that at root, the purpose of that system was to correct against excess of power by the elites in charge, which in those days were ‘nobles’ or ‘aristocrats’ or ‘feudal lords’. This was also the root concern of so-called ‘republics’ (like the US) or ‘democratic nations’ and so forth, the theory being that if the people elect the leaders every few years, corrupt leadership couldn’t possibly develop.

Today, elite power is concentrated in the hands of agencies which increasingly are divided into increasingly few, and in any case often interwovenly owned, keiretsu, or corporate networks, whose clout allows them, increasingly, to infiltrated and more or less control national government policies, which is why in more mature democracies, like the United States, it is increasingly difficult to perceive – on a policy vs. rhetoric level – the slightest difference between, for example, the previous Bush and subsequent Obama administration. The rhetoric might change, especially during campaign season, but the trajectory of national policy, be it military, social, medical and above all financial, does not. Each successive administration appoints people either from prior administrations and/or from leaders in the same industries (such as Big Ag, Big Pharma, Big Weapons, Big Finance – who are the Biggest of the Big since their few top firms outright own about 30-40% of all the other ones as proven by a well-known Swiss study a few years back). The officials’ job is to ‘oversee’ those same industries in the interests of the people (the role of government after all), but in fact for the benefit of those Corporate ‘Special Interests.’

Well, that’s a mouthful for a tiny, little baker on his tiny little blog. But this is an example of how everything is interconnected. It always has been and always will be and on every level, be it spiritual, psychological, conceptual, physical, chemical, phenomenological, ontological, microscopic, para-galactic etc. aka ‘the holographic universe.’

This is why the so-called ‘organic food movement’ – which doesn’t exist in any monolithic organised fashion of course – is important, because who we are both as individuals and as societies, or ‘communities’ as we like to call them in Cape Breton and Nova Scotia, is defined by what we do, and say, and feel, and think, which of course includes what we eat, including where it comes from, and how it is grown, treated, processed.

The lead point in pages 1-2 of the article linked above goes into how new processing methods which involve intense dessication (drying out) of cereal grains in the field prior to harvest use glyphosates, which enter the food chain and also damage microbial populations in soil. So these glyphosates are found especially in non-organic breads, cereals and of course also beer and whiskies.

This introductory section also goes into how both this sort of thing and introducing GM by companies such as Monsanto and Syngenta are being boosted by political leaders who often come from or are paid by those Corporate Special Interests.

To give you an idea of the style of this report, which alternates summarizing sections with links to further information, here is the Page 3 part concerning mainly Glyphosate alone, which is just one of many such issues broadly covered…. I can’t paste it in because of formatting problems….

Page 3 Fight for Life reportHopefully you can click on that to read, but if not just go to page 3 of the ‘Fight for Life’ report linked at the top. Actually, at top of page 4 they have a link to a YouTube video mentioned in the text about the dangers of GM foods:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_AHLDXF5aw&feature=player_embedded  This video is about how chemicals mess us up, basically, and how chemical toxicity undermines gut microbe integrity which in turn messes up the brain and many other systems, including liver enzyme function and much much more, involving autism, parkinsons, cholesterol cancer, chronic fatigue and so on.

I purchased and read Geoffrey Smith’s Seeds of Destruction a decade or so ago – about the dangers of GM foods – and highly recommend it. Although it’s fair to say that one cannot really determine if eating GM soy is bad for us in small quantities, it is quite clear that there is a pattern of bad science, deception, collusion between governments and Special Interests, and severe diseases in laboratory animals fed GM-based food regularly over time. At the very least there should be a moratorium on the methods and products until far more testing is done. Any fair-minded person reading this book – which is 80% comprised of extracts of a multitude of scientific reports – many of them previously unpublished – conducted by both Industry and govt-sponsored scientists, none of which are editorialized by the author, so you can read these reports and come to your own conclusions, an unusually fair and open way of presenting material. Indeed, I don’t remember ever seeing an argument, even a so-called ‘scientific’ argument, presented in such a thorough, open, objective fashion.

Well, the rest of the report you can read yourselves. The reason I am posting it is because this is also a first for me in that it links hard-core scientific papers dealing with Big Ag, shows the ties between Big Ag and Big Pharma (i.e. Sygenta) not only promote cancer-causing agents in agriculture, but then also own companies providing therapies (rarely cures) for cancer. A classic racket! It’s like the New Jersey mafia who used to have most of the heavy-duty transportation trucking contracts – which break up the roads – and then also the road-repair contracts, so the worse they made the roads and tore them up with their trucking fleets, the more money they made fixing the roads! And then further the corrupt ties between Big Companies and Government.

Indeed, some of the report even goes into the ‘conspiracy theory’ realm in the sense that corruption is so rampant that systemic collapse is almost inevitable, but not only that, it is even assumed, if not desired, that a certain amount of ‘depopulation’ is being planned for deliberately; how war in Syria was planned for two years before the Arab spring; how vaccines for viruses are largely fraudulent.

I cannot speak to the veracity of such viewpoints, but have always promoted organic and local foods – since the early 1970’s when I dropped out of college to go live on a spiritual commune in Munroe NY – mainly because it seems to me that this is a simple, direct intersection of politics, spirituality, economics, culture and so forth. Put another way: if we all ate organic, our entire culture would shift in so many ways – mainly because of resultant shifts in local community employment patterns, featuring people actually working together to make things together, wherein far more people would be making and doing things for local/regional clientele vs. simply selling stuff made in China or grown in Chile/California – that most of the large Corporate Interests and stupid things they make – including rotten films and television shows and controlled media etc. etc. etc. – would simply go away because people simply wouldn’t be buying into all that rubbish in the first place. On a more simple and immediate level, even though we might not be able to organise ourselves well in comparison with large Special Interests and Governments (which increasingly are the same thing), we can have considerable effect by the choices we make every day. And rather than just sheepishly going along with everything presented in Big Box Stores (whose presence is known to undermine small town / local community economies and yet who continually receive tax breaks to come in and drive away most small local businesses and replace them with minimum wage, low-skill jobs, little better than life prison sentences!), including what is offered in Supermarkets, we can choose to do things differently. As much as possible buy from Farmers’ Markets or local suppliers of any goods and services, including local shoe repair, sawmills, local service providers – construction, road repair, energy and other consultants etc. – and so on.

LINKS

These are the links I opened up – a very small selection – going through the article:

http://www.groundwork.org.za/Press%20Releases/Monsanto%20Publication%20-%20EN%20Final%20Version.pdf

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/pesticide-residue-found-on-nearly-half-of-organic-produce-1.2487712

http://www.criticalcollective.org/wp-content/uploads/GMO-emperor.pdf

http://www.seattleorganicrestaurants.com/vegan-whole-food/political-corruption-Monsanto.php

http://farmwars.info/?p=12140  (about corporate espionage)

http://www.naturalnews.com/041963_vaccines_cancer_viruses_Dr_Maurice_Hilleman.html#

(Merck vaccine developer admits vaccines routinely contain hidden cancer viruses from diseased monkeys, and how they introduced AIDS to the US from such vaccine operations)

http://braindrain.dk/ (chemical brain drain)

http://www.rcog.org.uk/womens-health/clinical-guidance/chemical-exposures-during-pregnancy-scientific-impact-paper-37

http://www.mpwhi.com/fda_says_so_what.htm (depopulation agenda)

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2013/04/24/is-there-a-global-depopulation-agenda-being-played-out/

(Note: I have not studied the depopulation agenda story. I am trying to avoid most of these things because am more interested in what can be done positively rather than dwelling on all the corruption. I am now satisfied that most of the elites and our political systems are dysfunctionally corrupt, even if many of the individuals working therein are sincere. I don’t need to keep reading about it any more and prefer not to, at the same time do not want to deny overmuch either.)

PS  a related article I just read, albeit not about this report:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/pesticide-residue-found-on-nearly-half-of-organic-produce-1.2487712

Short article showing disturbing levels of pesticides in organic produce. Yet another reason to support local farmers by asking for and then buying locally grown organic produce!

CBC article about benefits of sourdough fermenation viz. gluten

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/sourdough-breadmaking-cuts-gluten-content-in-baked-goods-1.2420209

A loaf from Fry's Red Wheat Bread in Victoria, B.C.

A loaf from Fry's Red Wheat Bread in Victoria, B.C. (courtesy Fry's Bakery)

“The demand for gluten-free products continues to grow and sales are expected to double by 2017 in Canada.

The anti-gluten trend is fuelled by the belief that, even for people not suffering from Celiac disease, wheat can cause health problems.

A handful of recent studies have some good news for those trying to reduce the amount of gluten they eat — old-fashioned sourdough baking techniques significantly cut gluten content in bread .

Byron FryByron Fry is the owner of the wood-fired sourdough bakery. (Khalil Akhtar/CBC)

Byron Fry runs a wood-fired sourdough bakery in Victoria, B.C. The fermentation process starts here with nothing but freshly ground wheat flour and water. The rest is up to the various yeasts that are floating around us that make themselves at home in the bubbling dough.

The result is a slightly sour loaf with cavernous holes throughout and before the advent of commercial yeasts, this was how bread was made.

“We’re starting with a long overnight sourdough fermentation that’s really full of lactic bacteria, that starts to break down and enrich the flavours of the bread and also break down the gluten and give a battery of enzymes and sourdough activity,” Fry explains.

“In the end, it’s airy and bubbly and then we craft those into loaves. They rest for even longer… and then they go into a 500 degree oven and bake for an hour and then they’re pulled out, allowed to cool… and then its food.”

This is all without that trusty jar of yeast that has become ubiquitous in modern bread baking. Most packaged supermarket loaves go from flour to plastic bag in a matter of a few hours.

But that quick rise doesn’t allow time for fermentation and that means the gluten isn’t processed by that community of microbes living in the dough.

Bread from Fry's BakeryAn assortment of breads on offer at Fry’s Bakery. (courtesy Fry’s Bakery)

A  team of Italian scientists led by Luigi Greco at the University of Naples authored a 2010 study that showed significantly lower levels of gluten in sourdough made according to old methods.

The difference was so stark that celiacs in the study were able to consume the sourdough with no ill effects.

That’s something Byron Fry sees in his bakery every day. He says the vast majority of his customers are people who were previously gluten-free.

The return of sourdough baking techniques isn’t only a boon to people who have trouble with gluten. It also means a return to the idea that bread from different places should taste different.

A sourdough starter made on the shores of Vancouver Island will be home to a different ecosystem of microbes than one in Montreal or Italy — which may lend some credence to the idea that the famous and historic San Francisco sourdough can only truly exist in San Francisco.”

NOTE:  I have read other articles showing how the San Francisco yeasts exist naturally in peoples’ mouths all over the world. However, it is true that bread with the same flour and technique varies from place to place, and also baker to baker. I don’t pretend to know exactly how this works, but suspect that along with differing varieties of local yeasts and bacteria in the fields where the grain is grown – which I believe comprise 95+% of the ones that end up fermenting the dough – different recurring levels of temperature and humidity make significant difference to an ongoing population. Most bakers keep a mother starter which is regularly added to, but also develops over time in more or less similar conditions, be it in a cellar, a refrigerator, refreshed every few hours in a home that is typically around 20C etc. This explains also why bread from two different bakers on the same street is so different. In any case, I have linked elsewhere on this site that 2010 Italian study and have mentioned its results to several passing-by non-clients who mention they are gluten intolerant or actual celiacs, but when I mention that Italian celiacs can eat slow-fermented sourdoughs, they clearly disbelieve me.

I will put this article out on my booth so they can see I am not making this up!!

Buckwheat – good for honey bees and humans

There are sprouted buckwheat groats in my Sprouted Multigrain loaf (though the distributor sent me kasha (roasted) by mistake so I’ll have to get some much more expensive stuff soon, or even better see if North River Organics can supply me with some local Buckwheat.) So, since it’s one of the bakery’s ingredients, why not give it a page/article. Obviously one can search for many more. I was especially interested about the effect in the gut which is emerging as an extremely important zone and not just a messy system of hollow tubes which can occasionally benefit from a scouring by roughage, or fiber. Indeed, there are more synaptic-producing cells in the gut than the brain. Personally, I have never bought into the brain-as-seat-of-consciousness/humanity superstition and have been gratified that Western Science is slowly turning around in that regard. Of course Asian systems never proposed that – though many in Asia have bought into Western fallacies hook, line and sinker the past 100 years, albeit now they are gradually reasserting their own common sense again so in the next century (long after I am here no longer) I expect a very productive fusion of theory and application which will effect everything – agriculture, food, philosophy, medicine, science, politics etc. Meanwhile, back to buckwheat:

http://www.naturalnews.com/025985_wheat_buckwheat_WHO.html

Buckwheat increases immune boosting friendly bacteria in the gut

Researchers at the University of Madrid fed rats a buckwheat rich diet for ten days. An additional group of ten rats were fed the same diet, but without buckwheat. At the end of the trial period, the intestines of the rats were analyzed and compared. The researchers found that rats receiving buckwheat had a significantly greater amount of friendly bacteria in their digestive tracts than did those in the control group. They also had three additional types of beneficial bacteria that were not present in the controls.

Why are intestinal bacteria so important? Friendly bacteria inhabit the digestive tract in massive numbers, crowding out harmful bacteria and proving protection against food borne and other illnesses. They assist with digestion and free valuable nutrients such as some of the B vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids, digestive enzymes such as lactase, and immune system constituents that seek out and destroy cancer cells.

This critical ecosystem of the digestive tract is fragile and easily disturbed. Antibiotics can completely kill off all friendly bacteria. Steroid drugs like cortisone or prednisone, birth control pills, and chemotherapy can destroy the balance of friendly bacteria leaving room for unfriendly bacteria to flourish. Poor nutrition, chlorinated water, and conventionally produced foods that contain pesticides also create havoc in the friendly bacteria population and place health in jeopardy. All these reasons make it extremely important to eat foods that encourage the growth of friendly intestinal bacteria.

Buckwheat is a gluten-free complete protein

Although many people think of buckwheat as being a grain, it is actually a fruit seed related to rhubarb and sorrel. Buckwheat flowers are highly fragrant, making them attractive to bees which use them to produce dark, richly flavored honey. Buckwheat has been grown in American since colonial days, and was once a common food on tables in the northeast and north central U.S. before being replaced by nutrient poor processed white flour primarily from wheat.

Although buckwheat has the look, feel, taste, and versatility of grain, buckwheat is not technically grain, and it contains no gluten. What it does contain is a full spectrum of essential amino acids, making it one of the few vegetarian sources of complete protein that equals the protein of fish or meat in quality.

Buckwheat has a nutty, rich flavor that complements many dishes. Its versatility allows it to replace meat in many recipes. Pure buckwheat flour can replace processed white flour almost across the board.

Buckwheat is available in a number of different forms, each with its own distinct taste and texture. When following recipes, selecting the right type of buckwheat will help ensure each dish is at its best.

Groats: These are buckwheat kernels that have been stripped of their inedible outer coating. They are three-sided in shape and resemble grains of wheat, oats, or rye in size. Groats can be used whole in cereals, breads and soups. Groats are often served as an alternative to rice, but they provide a much higher nutritional profile.

Kasha: Groats that have been roasted for a unique nutty flavor are sold as kasha and are often available in coarse, medium or fine grains.

Buckwheat Flour: Made from ground groats, buckwheat flour can be used to make those breakfast pancakes and waffles, along with bread, muffins, cookies and more.

Buckwheat rivals fruits and vegetables in its ability to promote health

Scientists have recently discovered that the phenolic content of grains equals that of fruits and vegetables when both free and bound phenols are measured. This discovery has clarified what was the mystery of why studies have shown populations eating diets high in fiber-rich whole grains consistently have lower risks of colon cancer, while studies concentrating on fiber alone have produced inconsistent results. Studies focused only on fiber have not taken into account the interactive effects and the complete nutrient picture in whole grains.

Research reported at the American Institute for Cancer Research International Conference on Food, Nutrition and Cancer by Rui Hai, Liu, M.D., Ph.D. and his colleagues at Cornell University has shown that the powerful cancer fighting potential of grains is in their wholeness. When any whole grain is refined and the bran and germ are removed, this wholeness is destroyed. The bran and germ of grain contains 83% of its phenolics. Whether from fruits and vegetables or grains, phenolics are powerful antioxidants that work in multiple ways to prevent disease in the body.

Buckwheat is rich in lignans that prevent breast cancer and heart disease

Whole grains such as buckwheat are one of the best sources for lignans which can be converted in the gut into mammalian lignans. One such lignan type, enterolactone, protects against breast and other hormone dependent cancers by competing with hormones to fill hormone receptors. This lignan also offers protection against heart disease. Women eating the most whole grains have been found to have significantly high blood levels of this lignan.

Buckwheat helps control blood sugar and reduces risk of diabetes and obesity

The nutrient profile of buckwheat has been shown to help control blood sugar in a study reported by The Worlds Healthiest Foods. In a test comparing the effects on blood sugar of whole buckwheat groats to bread made from refined wheat flour, the groats significantly lowered blood glucose and insulin responses. Whole buckwheat also scored highest in the ability to satisfy hunger.

Buckwheat is a rich source of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes including those involved in the body’s use of glucose and insulin secretion. Women who ate the most foods high in magnesium had a 24 percent lower risk of diabetes compared to women who ate the least.

The ability of buckwheat to lower the insulin response also helps it prevent and reduce obesity and gallstones. Its insoluble fiber not only speeds intestinal transit time, but reduces the secretion of bile acids which contribute to gallstone formation.

Prevent heart failure with a buckwheat breakfast

When Harvard researchers looked at the effects of whole grain consumption on heart failure risk, they followed 21,376 participants for 19.6 years. They found that men who ate a daily morning bowl of whole grain cereal had a 29% lower risk of heart attack.

Another recent study from South Korea evaluated the nutritional quality of buckwheat’s fiber content. The scientists found that consumption of buckwheat containing diets significantly improved several cardiovascular risk factors including total cholesterol, lipid profile, and levels of triglycerides. Rats fed with buckwheat and waxy barley showed a significantly larger aortic lumen than those fed with other grains. The aorta wall was significantly thinner in the buckwheat fed group. This study is from the Annals of Nutrient Metabolism, 2008.

Buckwheat is high in flavonoids

Some of buckwheat’s beneficial effects are due to its rich supply of the flavonoid rutin. Flavonoids are phyonutrients that protect against disease by extending the action of vitamin C, and by acting as antioxidants on their own. The lipid-lowering activity of buckwheat is largely due to these compounds. They help maintain blood flow, keep platelets from excessive clotting, and protect LDL cholesterol from free radical oxidation. Each of these activities adds to heart health.

Store buckwheat in the refrigerator in warm weather

Buckwheat’s exceptional nutritional profile makes it very attractive to bugs, so in warm climates or in warm weather, store it in the refrigerator in an airtight container. Buckwheat flour should be stored in the refrigerator year round. Like all grains, buckwheat requires thorough rinsing under running water before cooking. The basic recipe for preparing buckwheat is adding one part of buckwheat to two parts of boiling water or broth. After the liquid has returned to a boil, turn down the heat, cover and simmer for about 30 minutes.

Raw, sprouted buckwheat is the best buckwheat

Raw sprouted buckwheat offers the ultimate in healthy eating since the sprouting process releases all of its nutrients and preserves enzymes. Raw buckwheat groats can be sprouted and dehydrated at low temperature to make crunchy cereal that resembles grape nuts. Sprouted groats can be ground to make sprouted buckwheat flower for the ultimate in healthy pancake and waffle eating. Several companies offer raw sprouted buckwheat groats online for those interested in saving time and work. Here is a recipe for delicious, crunchy raw buckwheat treats that can be eaten for breakfast or anytime. If the groats are sprouted, so much the better.

[continues…]

Sourdough for Celiacs article

Now, this is going to be controversial, but it gets to the heart of why I offer the type of breads I do, namely all-and-only true, natural sourdoughs.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/food-processing-selected-sourdough-lactobacilli-and-fungal-proteases-create

Food processing by selected sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases to create detoxified wheat flour may be considered an efficient approach to eliminate gluten toxicity. – GreenMedInfo Summary

Abstract Title:

Highly efficient gluten degradation by lactobacilli and fungal proteases during food processing: new perspectives for celiac disease.

Abstract Source:

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Jul ;73(14):4499-507. Epub 2007 May 18. PMID: 17513580

Abstract Author(s):

Carlo G Rizzello, Maria De Angelis, Raffaella Di Cagno, Alessandra Camarca, Marco Silano, Ilario Losito, Massimo De Vincenzi, Maria D De Bari, Francesco Palmisano, Francesco Maurano, Carmen Gianfrani, Marco Gobbetti

Article Affiliation:

Department of Plant Protection and Applied Microbiology, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.

Abstract:

Presently, the only effective treatment for celiac disease is a life-long gluten-free diet. In this work, we used a new mixture of selected sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases to eliminate the toxicity of wheat flour during long-time fermentation. Immunological (R5 antibody-based sandwich and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and R5 antibody-based Western blot), two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight, strong-cation-exchange-liquid chromatography/capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time of flight [SCX-LC/CapLC-ESI-Q-TOF], and high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry) analyses were used to determine the gluten concentration. Assays based on the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and gamma interferon production by PBMCs and intestinal T-cell lines (iTCLs) from 12 celiac disease patients were used to determine the protein toxicity of the pepsin-trypsin digests from fermented wheat dough (sourdough). As determined by R5-based sandwich and competitive ELISAs, the residual concentration of gluten in sourdough was 12 ppm. Albumins, globulins, and gliadins were completely hydrolyzed, while ca. 20% of glutenins persisted. Low-molecular-weight epitopes were not detectable by SCX-LC/CapLC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry and R5-based Western blot analyses. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of the 33-mer by lactobacilli were highly efficient. All proteins extracted from sourdough activated PBMCs and induced gamma interferon production at levels comparable to the negative control. None of the iTCLs demonstrated immunoreactivity towards pepsin-trypsin digests. Bread making was standardized to show the suitability of the detoxified wheat flour. Food processing by selected sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases may be considered an efficient approach to eliminate gluten toxicity.

Article Published Date : Jun 30, 2007
Study Type : In Vitro Study

Modern Wheat is a Poison?

http://naturalsociety.com/doctor-says-genetically-modified-wheat-perfect-chronic-poison/

I am instinctively against most modern interferences with natural organisms. Our ancestors hybridized plants and animals and for some reason I trust them more, but post-industrial tinkering I just don’t trust, and especially the past few decades with genetic re-engineering.

Interesting about the modern introduction of gliadin, vs. gluten……

Recently I have been featuring more and more heritage grains in my line-up, but my modern wheat white loaves remain the most popular, especially the Garlic Focaccia and White Sandwich, both made with Meunerie Milanaise stone ground unbleached very high quality organic white flours.

But last week (Dec 2) I made my first Red Fife White Loaf from Milanaise’s first ever batch of Red Fife which they planted this summer as documented sporadically on this blog (because I had a small part to play in persuading them to grow it!). The timing was off last week for that particular batch, but nonetheless the bread was delicious. So next year, even though the bakery is under pressure financially, I intend to move over to all heritage grains at some point and trust that people will pay the extra dollar in return for the extra quality and health benefits.

Now the article linked above is not very thorough and far from complete, so I don’t regard it as gospel truth. Still, it echoes my own sneaking suspicion that even though I am offering the best possible quality wheat flours, and processing them with 100% organic/natural methods (slow sourdough fermentation), really I should be using Red Fife not modern wheat. The catch: I already pay double normal wheat costs for the Milanaise stone ground white. The Red Fife is almost double again, i.e. 4 times normal wheat costs. I can’t sell many more loaves per week than what I sell now, and am barely making enough income to continue. So if I increase ingredient costs without being able to pass this on, then I will lose income and the bakery won’t survive. It’s a Catch 22, but all I know is: I want to move over to heritage grains only.

So I will.

And let the chips fall where they may!!

Next week I’ll take some pictures of Red Fife loaves.

A recent menu addition is proving very popular: 70% Milanaise stone-ground rye; 30% fresh-ground Red Fife kernels (from Speerville Flour Mill). Hydration around 70%, a little sea salt, 0.2% caraway, that’s it. Delicious! Baked in a loaf pan (1 kg baked weight) to give it a good shape for slicing and popping into the toaster. I am hoping more of my customers will gradually begin to favor these darker loaves. I believe they are much more healthy, and also that way it is easier to give people the heritage grains since I believe rye has not been tampered with and is still very affordable, not to mention delicious.